Menu
Home Page

Year 3

Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three. This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move!

Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 1
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 2
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 3
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 4
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 5
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 6
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 7
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 8
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 9
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 10
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 11
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 12
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 13
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 14
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 15
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 16
Geoff from Team Rubicon delivered some scooter activities for the pupils of Year Three.  This included some basic skills, bunny hops, tandem skooting and high diving on the move! 17

As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf. The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier!

As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 1
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 2
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 3
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 4
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 5
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 6
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 7
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 8
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 9
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 10
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 11
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 12
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 13
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 14
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 15
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 16
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 17
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 18
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 19
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 20
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 21
As part of our sport week, the pupils of Year Three have been playing tri-golf.  The children initially got the hang of playing then we designed our own ‘Crazy Golf’ course to make playing even trickier! 22

The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human. Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only. With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron. The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured!

The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 1 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 2 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 3 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 4 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 5 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 6 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 7 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 8 Roasting marshmallows and being fire safe.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 9 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 10 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 11 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 12 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 13 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 14 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 15 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 16
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 17 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 18 The fire is finally alight!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 19 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 20 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 21 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 22 The fire is starting to take hold.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 23 Showing the class how to safely light a fire.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 24 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 25 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 26 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 27 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 28 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 29 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 30 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 31 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 32 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 33 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 34 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 35 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 36 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 37 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 38 Using bow and drill to start a fire is hard work!
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 39 Teaching how to use a fire steel safely.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 40 Trying to get a spark from a fire steel.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 41 Trying to get a spark from a fire steel.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 42 Trying to get a spark from a fire steel.
The pupils of Year Three learnt how important fire was to the Stone Age human.    Before fire, mankind ate only food raw and kept warm by body heat only.  With the advent of fire, came cooking, warmth, light and the discovery of bronze and later iron.  The two kinds of fire lighting techniques being used are bow drill (A Palaeolithic to modern day technique) and fire steel (An Iron Age to modern day technique). The children learnt how difficult it was for Stone Age people to capture fire by using a friction technique to harness fire compared to modern day ease. The marshmallows were not mammoth flavoured! 43 Trying to get a spark from a fire steel.

Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic. The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either!

Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 1
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 2
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 3
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 4
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 5
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 6
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 7
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 8
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 9
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 10
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 11
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 12
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 13
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 14
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 15
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 16
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 17
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 18
Stonehenge is one of the world’s most famous monuments. It stands on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, and its giant stones can be seen from miles around. Stonehenge was built over many hundreds of years. Work began in the late Neolithic Age, around 3000 BC. Over the next thousand years, people made many changes to the monument. The last changes were made in the early Bronze Age, around 1500 BC. We may never know exactly why Stonehenge was built, but people probably gathered there for religious ceremonies. The pupils of Year Three designed their own ‘henges’ on paper then, using a mixture of clay, blocks and plasiticine, constructed their own monolithic.  The results were amazing and didn’t take a thousand years to build either! 19

• Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together. The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did!

•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 1 Using basic knots for tying is very tricky!
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 2 Ensuring the spear haft works.
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 3 Iron Age tools used to Carve Stone Age tools...
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 4 The haft and tip are joined but will they hold?
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 5 First attempt at tying haft to the ‘stone’ tip!
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 6 Binding and winding seemed to work!
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 7 A beautiful square lashing!
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 8 Trying to square lash ‘stone’ to wood.
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 9 Using metal scissors. What an amazing invention!
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 10
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 11
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 12
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 13
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 14
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 15
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 16
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 17
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 18
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 19
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 20
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 21
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 22
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 23
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 24
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 25
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 26
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 27
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 28
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 29
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 30
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 31
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 32
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 33
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 34
•	Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) groups developed increasingly complex tools and objects made of stone and natural fibres. These people had to invent and innovate to make more complex and useful tools. Palaeolithic humans made tools of stone, bone, and wood. The early Palaeolithic’s were the first users of stone tools. In Year Three, we tried to replicate making useful tools, using a strong plastic in place of stone, but keeping to the original features of wood and twine to bind them together.  The children had to work as groups to collaborate and share knowledge, as our ancestors did! 35

The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication. The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter.

The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 1 Measuring needed to be accurate.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 2 Deciding where to start!
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 3 Using tips of toes to hold ruler in place.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 4 Working out the perimeter.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 5 Getting the 90 degree angle is tricky.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 6 A larger perimeter!
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 7 Accuracy is essential.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 8 Using the 90 degree angle of a whiteboard.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 9 Whiteboards for 90 degree corners.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 10 Accurate 90 degree angles.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 11
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 12 The first perimeter complete.
The children of Year Three have been learning all about perimeter and its links to multiplication.  The class carried out a lesson where they used chalk to sketch out the dimensions of different quadrilaterals and then worked out the perimeter. 13 A bird eye’s view of activities today!

As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic. We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic.

As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 1 Applying hieroglyphics.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 2 Colouring a death mask.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 3 Learning how to play Senet.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 4 Small canonic jars.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 5 Hieroglyphics.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 6 Building a pyramid with pyramids!
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 7 Dressing up!
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 8 Applying hieroglyphics.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 9 Looking at the mummy inside the casket.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 10 The 2500 year old mummy.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 11 High priestess and priest walk around the ‘body’.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 12 Organs are removed.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 13
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 14 Removing the organs.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 15 Learning about canopic jar contents.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 16 Adding the all seeing eye of Horus.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 17 Shrouded and wearing a death mask.
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 18 Weighing and judging the heart...
As part of our study of ancient Egypt, the pupils of Year Three went on a trip to the Torquay museum to visit the ancient Egyptian exhibition and to enhance and to bring to life our classroom topic.  We discovered a mummy over two and a half thousand years old, learnt about some of their customs and beliefs and also participated in a role-play mummification. The whole class had an amazing day and the whole experience really brought to life the ancient Egypt topic. 19 The class strike a pose!

The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible. Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit. They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification.

The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 1 Cutting into the skin.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 2 Cutting into the skin.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 3 Tidy scientific experimentation area.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 4 Scooping out the innards.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 5 Removing the innards.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 6 Scooping out the innards!
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 7 Working scientifically.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 8 Applying an embalming substitute.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 9 Using scientific tools for applying chemicals.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 10 Using a pipette to apply hand cleaner.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 11 Using scientific tools for applying chemicals.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 12 Adding salt!
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 13 Adding salt to the inside of the tomato.
The pupils of Year Three carried out the ancient Egyptian method of mummification to dry out bodies but used tomatoes instead as they, like the human body, have high water content. They removed all the insides of the tomato and cleaned with towels, ensuring the inside was as dry as possible.  Instead of embalming, they used hand sanitizer to clean and purify the tomato and to stop the tomato’s enzymes from decomposing the fruit.   They then packed the inside cavity of the tomato with salt to draw out the remaining moisture and to ensure perfect mummification. 14 More salt.

Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same. The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made.

Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 1
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 2
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 3
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 4
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 5
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 6
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 7
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 8
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 9
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 10
Something is symmetrical when it is the same on both sides. A shape has symmetry if a central dividing line (a mirror line) can be drawn on it, to show that both sides of the shape are exactly the same.  The pupils in Year Three were asked to identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations. They needed to be aware that shapes have more than one line of symmetry. They looked at the regular shapes in the pictures and investigated into how many lines of symmetry they could find. It was helpful for them to cut out the shapes and fold them in half, then look at how many folds they had made. 11

As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could. There were some impressive results!

As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 1
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 2
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 3
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 4
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 5
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 6
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 7
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 8
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 9
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 10
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 11
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 12
As part of British Science Week ⌗BSW19 the children of Year Three have been constructing the tallest tower that can hold a 200g weight. Using only paper straws and sellotape, the children spent an hour building the biggest tower they could.  There were some impressive results! 13

Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat. As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.

Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  1 Getting prepared for the experiment.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  2 Breaking up the food.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  3 Breaking up the food.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  4 The bag represents the stomach.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  5 Cola is added as a ‘stomach acid’.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  6 Cola is added as a ‘stomach acid’.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  7 The stomach ‘churns’ its contents.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  8 The stomach ‘churns’ its contents.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  9 Stomach contents enter the small intestine...
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  10 Food makes its way through small intestine.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  11 Food makes its way through small intestine.
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  12 Nutrients are absorbed by the body!
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  13 Nutrients are absorbed by the body!
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  14 The food enters its final stages...
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  15 ... and is realised from the body!
Humans need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.  As such, Year Three carried out a scientific experiment to see how food enters our body, how the body gains nutrition from the food and what organs carry out each function and finally how the waste product exits the body. Pupils are continuing to learn about the importance of nutrition and finding out how different parts of the body have special functions.  16 The end product!

Year Three held their class assembly today. It was all about how Osiris became the first mummy of Egypt! The children enjoyed acting out this tale.

Year Three held their class assembly today.  It was all about how Osiris became the first mummy of Egypt!  The children enjoyed acting out this tale. 1

The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone.

The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 1 Trying to work out where the bones in my body are.
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 2 Ensuring bones meet bones and can bend at joints.
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 3 A life-size skeleton used a pupil as a template.
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 4
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 5
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 6
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 7
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 8
The pupils in Year Three are learning all about the human skeleton and the part it plays in the body's framework. It is made of bones, which provide a firm surface for muscles to attach to, so that they can move. Without a skeleton, we would not be able to move at all. The skeleton also supports the body and protects our internal organs. The heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and the brain is surrounded by the bones of the skull. The nerves leading from the brain are protected by the backbone. 9

Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on.

Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 1
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 2
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 3
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 4
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 5
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 6
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 7
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 8
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 9
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 10
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 11
Year Three has been mastering place value when carrying out column subtraction problems. When children need to exchange, they can visually see the process happening with counters. Deeper understanding in Year Three will enable faster progress later on. 12

The children from Year Three have started to learn about ancient Egypt and the pharaohs. As part of Art, the children have been using water colours to paint their own pharaoh death masks.

The children from Year Three have started to learn about ancient Egypt and the pharaohs.  As part of Art, the children have been using water colours to paint their own pharaoh death masks. 1
The children from Year Three have started to learn about ancient Egypt and the pharaohs.  As part of Art, the children have been using water colours to paint their own pharaoh death masks. 2
The children from Year Three have started to learn about ancient Egypt and the pharaohs.  As part of Art, the children have been using water colours to paint their own pharaoh death masks. 3
The children from Year Three have started to learn about ancient Egypt and the pharaohs.  As part of Art, the children have been using water colours to paint their own pharaoh death masks. 4

With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication. It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.

With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  1
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  2
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  3
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  4
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  5
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  6
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  7
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  8
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  9
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  10
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  11
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  12
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  13
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  14
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  15
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  16
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  17
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  18
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  19
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  20
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  21
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  22
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  23
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  24
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  25
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  26
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  27
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  28
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  29
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  30
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  31
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  32
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  33
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  34
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  35
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  36
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  37
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  38
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  39
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  40
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  41
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  42
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  43
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  44
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  45
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  46
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  47
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  48
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  49
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  50
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  51
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  52
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  53
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  54
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  55
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  56
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  57
With the anniversary of 100 years since the end of the First World War, Year Three ventured up to the local Cenotaph to pay their remember all those from this community who were caught up in the courageous but tragic events of the First World War. We placed our Remembrance pebbles and then spoke The Exhortation, held a two-minute silence and then read the Kohima Epitaph dedication.  It was a poignant moment for the children and it was great to remember the event in this way.  58

The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately. The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground. Results were very accurate to magnetic north!

The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 1
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 2
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 3
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 4
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 5
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 6
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 7
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 8
The pupils of Year Three have been learning to use magnetic compasses to tell direction accurately.  The children orientated magnetic north on the compass then drew their own four cardinal points of the compass on the ground.  Results were very accurate to magnetic north! 9

As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.

As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  1
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  2
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  3
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  4
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  5
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  6
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  7
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  8
As Mexico is our theme, the children have been painting Calaveras, making them as bright and as eye-catching as possible. The children used fine paintbrushes to achieve the spectacular results.  9

As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon!

As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 1
As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 2
As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 3
As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 4
As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 5
As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 6
As the weather was beautiful on a September’s day, we took the maths learning outside and used the playground as a giant canvas to learn upon! 7

The pupils have been learning to ‘exchange’ ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition problems.

The pupils have been learning to ‘exchange’ ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition problems. 1
The pupils have been learning to ‘exchange’ ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition problems. 2
The pupils have been learning to ‘exchange’ ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition problems. 3
The pupils have been learning to ‘exchange’ ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition problems. 4

The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results.

The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 1
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 2
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 3
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 4
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 5
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 6
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 7
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 8
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 9
The children of Year Three have been practicing their knowledge of place value during maths, producing great results. 10

Welcome to Year Three

 

Daily Routine

 

Children will enter the school via one of the two entrances available (car park and playground area), then into the main hall where they will hang up their bags and coats, before moving to the classroom for registration.

 

Reading 
Your child should bring a reading book and reading diary home with them everyday. To develop comprehension skills, it would be useful if you could read with your child three times a week and question them about what they have read. Please sign the reading diary when you have worked with your child or, if the child is reading independently, they can write a capital ‘H’ denoting they have read at home.

Spellings
Your child should bring a list of spellings home with them on a Monday. They are tested on these words the following Monday so please ensure they practice the words at home and have their spelling books in school every day. A good way of practising spellings is by using: look, say, cover, write, check- reading the word, saying the word, covering it and then having a go at writing it. The children also can use the pyramid way of spelling their words as well.

Homework
Homework is given to your child every other Friday and children are given nearly two weeks to complete this. It should be returned on a Wednesday. Homework is set in a menu format where there are a number of optional activities to complete. Homework that is expected to be completed by everyone is as follows: spellings, learning of tables, /key number facts and reading.


Times Tables
Please continue to encourage your child to learn their times tables. Knowing them really helps in many aspects of maths. They are tested on their times table knowledge regularly. This includes knowing the division facts that relate to the multiplication. Children should also be able to ‘wire it up’ and carry out division operations as well as multiplication.

 

MyMaths

 

MyMaths.co.uk is an online homework for children in Year Three. Normally, three sets of homework is set on Friday and it is due in the following Friday. The maths is self-marking so the children can instantly see how well they have done and can re-take the homework for a better final result. If using an iPad, then download Puffin Academy from iTunes. This will then allow access via iPad without the use of a Flash Media Player. Children have their own login and passwords.

 

IXL

 

Children also have access to IXL, a online homework that is all about grammar and will really help the children develop their understanding of grammar. Children have their own login and passwords. We will be using this program in school this year for learning and children are able to use it at home as well.

 

P.E


P.E. is usually on Mondays and Wednesdays. However, please ensure your child has their P.E. kit in school at all times as we often have specialist teachers that visit on different days which involves extra P.E.


If you have any concerns about your child, please don't hesitate to get in touch with either Mr Spamer, Mrs Hurst or on every alternating Wednesday Mrs Tighe or Mrs Luscombe.

 

We hope your child really enjoy their time in Year Three!

  • Pomphlett Primary School,
  • Howard Road, Plymstock,
  • Plymouth, Devon, PL9 7ES
Top