Menu
Home Page

Year 3D

On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow!

On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 1
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 2
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 3
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 4
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 5
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 6
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 7
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 8
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 9
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 10
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 11
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 12
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 13
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 14
On Friday afternoon Plymouth Diving came to visit us, bringing with them Aidan Heslop, an ex- Pomphlett pupil! We took part in activities to show our skills in jumping, balancing, rolling and head stands as these are all key skills for divers. We had lots of fun and were blown away when Aidan rewarded our hard work by showing us a couple of backflips! Wow! 15

The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing!

The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 1
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 2
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 3
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 4
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 5
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 6
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 7
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 8
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 9
The magnetic compass is an ancient navigational tool used to indicate the four cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. It's composed of a magnetised needle that aligns itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north. If you find yourself lost without a compass, you can easily make your own using a piece of magnetised metal and a bowl of water. Whether you're using a sewing needle or another metal item, rub the item with the magnet. Stroke the needle in the same direction, rather than back and forth, using steady, even strokes. After 30-40 strokes, the needle will be magnetised. Fill a bowl or jar with a few inches of water and place the compass on a leaf in the water. The magnetised needle will align itself with the earth's magnetic field to point north to south. The children of Year Three followed these simple steps and the results were amazing! 10

In our English lessons we've been learning a scene from Stig of the Dump in preparation to write our own versions! Today we acted out parts of the scene and Miss D was really impressed by our enthusiasm and expressions! Watch this space for future actors and actresses!

In our English lessons we've been learning a scene from Stig of the Dump in preparation to write our own versions! Today we acted out parts of the scene and Miss D was really impressed by our enthusiasm and expressions! Watch this space for future actors and actresses! 1
In our English lessons we've been learning a scene from Stig of the Dump in preparation to write our own versions! Today we acted out parts of the scene and Miss D was really impressed by our enthusiasm and expressions! Watch this space for future actors and actresses! 2
In our English lessons we've been learning a scene from Stig of the Dump in preparation to write our own versions! Today we acted out parts of the scene and Miss D was really impressed by our enthusiasm and expressions! Watch this space for future actors and actresses! 3
In our English lessons we've been learning a scene from Stig of the Dump in preparation to write our own versions! Today we acted out parts of the scene and Miss D was really impressed by our enthusiasm and expressions! Watch this space for future actors and actresses! 4

After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age!

After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 1
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 2
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 3
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 4
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 5
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 6
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 7
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 8
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 9
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 10
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 11
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 12
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 13
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 14
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 15
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 16
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 17
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 18
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 19
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 20
After learning about cave painting discoveries we headed out onto the playground to create some of our own drawings! We discussed what materials would have been used and how dark it would have been for the people of the Stone Age to create their artwork. Luckily for us the sun was out and we made some incredible drawings of what we may have seen and encountered if we were alive during the Stone Age! 21

As part of the National Curriculum, we have been learning about the four cardinal points of the compass and directional language. The class have been using Ordnance Survey maps to study the geographical layout of Plymouth and Dartmoor. The children are beginning to understand how to orientate a map to the ground with the aid of a magnetic compass and are developing an understanding of scale.

As part of the National Curriculum, we have been learning about the four cardinal points of the compass and directional language. The class have been using Ordnance Survey maps to study the geographical layout of Plymouth and Dartmoor. The children are beginning to understand how to orientate a map to the ground with the aid of a magnetic compass and are developing an understanding of scale.  1
As part of the National Curriculum, we have been learning about the four cardinal points of the compass and directional language. The class have been using Ordnance Survey maps to study the geographical layout of Plymouth and Dartmoor. The children are beginning to understand how to orientate a map to the ground with the aid of a magnetic compass and are developing an understanding of scale.  2
As part of the National Curriculum, we have been learning about the four cardinal points of the compass and directional language. The class have been using Ordnance Survey maps to study the geographical layout of Plymouth and Dartmoor. The children are beginning to understand how to orientate a map to the ground with the aid of a magnetic compass and are developing an understanding of scale.  3
As part of the National Curriculum, we have been learning about the four cardinal points of the compass and directional language. The class have been using Ordnance Survey maps to study the geographical layout of Plymouth and Dartmoor. The children are beginning to understand how to orientate a map to the ground with the aid of a magnetic compass and are developing an understanding of scale.  4
As part of the National Curriculum, we have been learning about the four cardinal points of the compass and directional language. The class have been using Ordnance Survey maps to study the geographical layout of Plymouth and Dartmoor. The children are beginning to understand how to orientate a map to the ground with the aid of a magnetic compass and are developing an understanding of scale.  5

We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.

We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.  1
We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.  2
We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.  3
We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.  4
We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.  5
We have been learning how to use the decomposition method to solve subtraction problems as a pre-cursor to formal column subtraction. The children are now secure with this aspect and have started to exchange ten ones for one ten when carrying out column addition and exchanging one ten for ten ones when carrying out column subtraction. They are well on their way to being able to solve complex two-digit column methods independently.  6

A little bit of rain doesn't stop 3D from being active! We love dancing and exercising with Jumpstart Johnny and can't wait for the school disco to show off our moves!

A little bit of rain doesn't stop 3D from being active! We love dancing and exercising with Jumpstart Johnny and can't wait for the school disco to show off our moves! 1
A little bit of rain doesn't stop 3D from being active! We love dancing and exercising with Jumpstart Johnny and can't wait for the school disco to show off our moves! 2

As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on!

As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on! 1
As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on! 2
As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on! 3
As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on! 4
As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on! 5
As part of understanding the Stone Age, 3D jumped in their time machines and were transported back to the Paleolithic period to learn about how hunter-gatherers followed the herds and lived off the land. One of the strengths of our ancestors was communication and teamwork. This allowed them to thrive in a hostile world. Making tents out of sticks, vines and animal skins was key to their survival. We thought carefully about where would have been a good place to make a camp, considering water sources, shelter from the elements and access to food sources! Then we replicated the shelters by making our own tents,using Clingfilm for the waterproof layer instead of mammoth fur! We also thought about how we would keep warm inside our tents and added leaves and grass to make a cosy layer to sit on! 6

Welcome to Year Three!

 

Our Daily Routine

 

Children will enter the school via one of the two entrances available (Front or rear gate), then into the classroom where they will hang up their bags and coats, ready for registration at nine o’clock.

 

Our school homework policy states that all children are expected to complete the following home learning: reading, spelling and learning maths facts. In addition, there is a menu of activities from which they can choose to complete a range of tasks. Although this work is not compulsory, we would strongly advise that home learning becomes a regular feature of all children’s experiences. This is to build successful lifelong learners and a strong partnership with school.

 

Reading 


Your child should bring a reading book and reading diary home with them everyday. To develop comprehension skills, it would be useful if you could read with your child three times a week and question them about what they have read. Please sign the reading diary when you have worked with your child or, if the child is reading independently, they can write a capital ‘H’ denoting they have read at home.

Spellings


Your child should bring a list of spellings home with them on a Monday. They are tested on these words the following Monday so please ensure they practice the words at home and have their spelling books in school every day. A good way of practising spellings is by using: look, say, cover, write, check- reading the word, saying the word, covering it and then having a go at writing it. The children also can use the pyramid way of spelling their words as well. On a Monday, we will test children by getting them to put their practised spellings into sentences.

Homework


Homework is given to your child every other Friday and children are given nearly two weeks to complete this. It should be returned on a Wednesday. Homework is set in a menu format where there are a number of optional activities to complete. Homework that is expected to be completed by everyone is as follows: spellings, learning of tables/key number facts and reading.

 

MyMaths

 

MyMaths.co.uk is an online homework for children in Year Three. Normally, three sets of homework is set on Friday and it is due in the following Friday. The maths is self-marking so the children can instantly see how well they have done and can re-take the homework for a better final result. Logins have been provided to your child.

 

IXL

 

Children also have access to IXL, a online homework that is all about grammar and will really help the children develop their understanding of grammar. Children have their own login and passwords. We will be using this program in school this year for learning and children are able to use it at home as well.

 

Scintilla Spark

 

Children have access to an app called Scintilla SparkSPARK is an adaptive spaced-repetition learning platform that tracks how well pupils remember knowledge. The adaptive AI algorithm automatically tailors questions to suit each pupil so that their forgetting is interrupted at the optimal time. Pupils then use Spark to help them remember knowledge via quizzes and games. Logins have been provided to your child.

 

TT Rockstars

 

Each week, TT Rockstars concentrates on a different times table, with a recommended consolidation week for rehearsing the tables that have recently been practised every third week or so. This format has very successfully boosted times tables recall speed for hundreds of thousands of pupils over the last 8 years in over 14,000 schools - both primary and secondary - worldwide. Pupils have been provided with their own passwords and are encouraged to logon at home. Please continue to encourage your child to learn their times tables. Knowing them really helps in many aspects of maths. They are tested on their times table knowledge regularly. This includes knowing the division facts that relate to the multiplication. Children should also be able to ‘wire it up’ and carry out division operations as well as multiplication.

 

P.E


P.E. is usually on Mondays and Tuesdays. However, please ensure your child has their P.E. kit in school at all times as we often have specialist teachers that visit on different days which involves extra P.E.


If you have any concerns about your child, please don't hesitate to get in touch with either Miss Davidson, Mrs hurst or Mrs Plant on Fridays.

 

We hope your child really enjoys their year in 3D!

  • Pomphlett Primary School,
  • Howard Road, Plymstock,
  • Plymouth, Devon, PL9 7ES
Top